Marion Simms
3 min readJun 15, 2020

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AT-HOME SKINCARE DEVICES: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

“At the end of the day, the best wrinkle is the one you never get.”

With many salons still closed and the threat of the virus still persisting, we may just as well try these at-home skincare devices available on the market promising as-good-as-spa (if not better) results.

The question is do they work? The short answer is yes and no. Here’s the lowdown.

Ultrasonic cleansing brushes and hair removal devices had the best track record for many years according to Philips and Wendy Lewis & Co Ltd. That might be because results are immediately tangible — less hair, cleaner pores — and fit easily into one’s daily routine — cleansing and shaving.

And there is a new kid on the block. A microsonic silicone cleansing device that is easy to hold, can clean the skin six times more effectively than hands and is very easy to keep clean and maintain.

Quartz rollers have been around for quite a while and come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Regardless of which quartz they are made of they do feel pleasant when used all over the face. I also recommend warming them under hot water before use to soothe sinus issues and for puffy, tired eyes cooling them in the fridge for fifteen minutes before use. Keep them clean with warm water and soap and stored in a soft cloth to avoid scratches.

Anti-aging devices are a little harder to assess — for example at-home microcurrent, LED and ultrasound handheld units.

Quality can be an issue and some are so high-tech that they need FDA approval. Many are quite costly as well ($500- $1000). They also need to be used 10–15 minutes a day for several weeks before seeing results.

And here’s the rub! How many times have we purchased workout equipment with the best of intentions only to have it collecting dust three months later?

Compliance and consistency are your skin’s best friend. But only the most disciplined and leisurely of us could comply with the recommended use of these home devices.

And, if used incorrectly or on the wrong skin condition, some of the more sophisticated ones could potentially damage your skin.

In conclusion, we have not reached the point where the fountain of youth can be found in our bathrooms or anywhere at home.

A relaxing seventy-five minute facial treatment at your favorite spa where the technicians use the most cutting edge and proven electrical equipment will always be more beneficial and relaxing for most of us.

But, in current social-distancing times, and while we are unable to book an appointment at our favorite spa, at-home devices of the right quality can be used by the disciplined client as an adjunct to a regular spa routine. And, even when we are able to get our beloved treatments again, can prolong the benefits in-between visits.

If you have any at-home skincare device questions, call Marion Simms at SkinSense Wellness at (323) 653–4701.

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Marion Simms

I have been in the skin care industry for over 25 years as teacher, beauty therapist, lecturer, consultant, writer and business owner of Skin Sense Wellness.